8.01 A Why doesn’t my office look like Google? A critical examination of workplace strategy initiatives and workplace change
Wednesday, April 5, 2017 3:15 PM - 3:50 PM
Venue: Caesars Palace
Room: Forum 17-19

Workplace strategy has become a supposedly valued component of every organization that interfaces with workplace design. Architectural/interior design organizations, furniture manufacturers and real estate organizations have all entered the field offering often similar and indistinguishable workplace strategy services. Real estate and facility management conferences all focus on the topic. It has gained momentum in the past several years and almost no organization that touches the world of workplace design, furniture and real estate hasn’t added some form of workplace strategy component to their menu of services. As a profession, one can trace its origins back at least 20 years to Dr Frank Duffy’s seminal PhD thesis on charting organizational topologies through work modes and not derivative of status and hierarchy. Every year we all attend conferences on workplace strategies ranging from ‘alternative workplace strategies,’ ‘activity workplace strategies, ‘and ‘mobile workplace strategies.’ And every year we proclaim we have found the answer to our client’s problems and this ‘strategy’ will ensure higher performance, collaboration and innovation. Yet more often than not, work space strategy is seen as a euphemism for densification, often with user perception that, “they’re here to take my office away.” Despite the acceleration into this field the past 10 years, the reality remains that the vast majority of business organizations have not adopted the strategic initiatives that have been promoted and are still working in work environments that look very much like those of 20 years ago with the exception of technology. Workplace strategy has become a supposedly valued component of every organization that interfaces with workplace design. Architectural/interior design organizations, furniture manufacturers and real estate organizations have all entered the field offering often similar and indistinguishable workplace strategy services. Real estate and facility management conferences all focus on the topic. It has gained momentum in the past several years and almost no organization that touches the world of workplace design, furniture and real estate hasn’t added some form of workplace strategy component to their menu of services. Despite the acceleration into this field the past 10 years, the reality remains that the vast majority of business organizations have not adopted the strategic initiatives that have been promoted and are still working in work environments that look very much like those of 20 years ago with the exception of technology.

Learning Objectives
Learn why a critical analysis of workplace strategy is necessary and a long time in coming
Learn why workplace strategy has not achieved its full potential and what needs to happen to correct this
Develop an understanding of why it is important for more evidence based reseaerch be done on workplace strategy initiatives
Levels of Learning
300 level
Track/Topic Area:
Workplace Evolutionaries (WE) Community
Speaker(s)
Arnold Levin, Principal, Workplace Strategies, Smith Group Jjr